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Blog Posts captpaul

East Bay Pattern

Posted on Thursday, 08/09/12 10:47 am by captpaul in Galveston Bay Fishing Report with Capt Paul Marcaccio
Bolivar Peninsula- Best Kept Secret Just a few miles northeast of Galveston Island lies the strip of land called the Bolivar Peninsula. Anglers largely overlook the peninsula, as they pass by its shores on the way to crowded East Bay hot spots. The fact of the matter is that the peninsula has a lot to offer anglers year round, particularly in the winter months. The peninsula appeals to boaters, wade fishermen, and land based fishermen. Fishing opportunities for boaters are almost endless. Among the most popular places in Bolivar for boaters are the jetties. The jetties serve as a breakwater for the Galveston-Houston Ship channel, while at the same time, providing an ideal structure for attracting forage fish and the predators that feed on them. This structure holds fish year round. Wintertime is extremely productive because of the combination of structure and quick access to the deep water of the ship channel. The best bait in this area is finger mullet, if not available, use Saltwater Assassins, or Stanley Jigs. These soft plastics offer great hook ups if worked slowly. Also, use Mirrolure slow sinking plugs like the MR 19, 38 or 51 series. Color varies depending on water clarity. Light for clear and dark for off-colored water The Intercostals Waterway runs between the backside of Bolivar and Goat Island. Speckled trout, Redfish and Flounder (Texas Grand Slam as some refer to catching’ all three the same day). The waterway is an excellent area to fish when those blue northern are upon us. The shoreline is all but protected except for a gusty northeast or southwest wind…………………Be sure and wear wading boots to protect ones legs from our flounders with pony tails???? All year long. ForEverlast Boots work great. Se them at FTU in Houston or Katy, Texas Seviers Cove and the Pig Pens are two of the many spots boaters target for winter, or fall patterns for trout and redfish. Seviers Cut is a land cut in Goat Island with a shallow channel into East Bay. The Pig Pens is located on the bay side of East Bay, just west of Seviers. Soft baits like mentioned earlier along with the famous Corky by Paul Brown, works for those sow trout. Most anglers prefer to wade the latter both early and late afternoon, with an outgoing tide. Be sure and have a good graphite rod and small diameter line, so as not to attract too much attention. Fishing Tackle Unlimited has a tremendous rod called the All-Pro Series Green Rod…………………………….and Sufix Line to spool that great reel in 30lb test. The Bolivar Pocket is another popular wade fishing spot on the peninsula. The Pocket is located between the old lighthouse and the base of the Bolivar Jetties. This is a prime spot to target as the temperature drops with winter cold fronts………………………….. The Bay side of Rollover Pass is also a very productive area to wade during the winter and fall months. Mirrolures and the Stanley wedge tail top the list to throw when wading Rollover Bay. Both resemble a mullet, which is a winter meal for that trophy trout that looks for that one good meal for several days……………….. Rollover Pass and the jetties are two of the most productive areas for land-based fishermen. The cooler months of the years are plagued with single tides coupled with minimal tidal movement. Any trout fisherman will tell you,” Moving water catches moving fish. ”Rollover Pass is just that area. Trophy trout and redfish congregate and feed in that narrow pass. Live shrimp will almost always work for a large stringer of solid fish, but it’s next to impossible to find that time of year. See a white flag. Stop and get ‘em. Live finfish, solid-bodied mullet imitation and large soft plastics accounts for most of the truly large trout pulled from the pass each year at that time………………….. Bolivar is loaded with good winter and fall fishing locations and deserves a little investigation. With the upcoming hunting season, our fishing brothers have thinned out greatly. This gives those of us who fish year round a little more quiet time to catch that speckled trout or redfish. These prime areas receive less pressure at this time of year. Your brothers that are reading this at the deer camp always have fun outdoors. This writer will be thinking about you………………… Until next time, good Fishin’ or just as my fishing mentor always use to say, “Have Fun Outdoors”. We love you’ll Pappy and Junior. God bless……… Capt Paul Marcaccio U.S.C.G. & T.P. &W. license
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Pic's & A Tribute

Posted on Sunday, 04/01/12 3:07 pm by captpaul in Galveston Bay Fishing Report with Capt Paul Marcaccio
A Good Picture Is Worth 1000 Words Memorable fish catches don’t come along on every fishing trip, but when they do, you certainly want a permanent record of the occasion. You could, of course, take your catch to the taxidermist and have a real fine wall mount made. I’ve gone that route, and it is satisfactory to a point. The problem is this can become quite expensive. I’ve been sport fishing since 1965 and if I had a wall mount made of every big fish I’ve caught or especially admired, I would be trophy rich and money poor. No, not every fish I’ve caught was a record at the time. Other points figure in, like the circumstances under which the fish was caught, the tackle or special lure used, etc., etc. There is an inexpensive way you can make permanent those memorable catches. Photograph the catch. If it’s to be a record of the catch, you need to do some planning in taking the photo. Simply pointing the camera and pressing the shutter release is not enough. First off, consider the background. Don’t clutter it up with objects and whatnots totally unrelated to fishing. Use a marine background. You can shoot from a low angle and have clouds in the background or shoot for a high angle and get the water in the background. Or you can take the photo in the boat with tackle, motor, and etc. in the background. The main object in the picture is going to be the fish. Present its best side to the camera and wet the body before taking the photo. This will give it a more lifelike appearance. If the fish has been cleaned, don’t turn the cavity to the camera. And forget all about holding the fish out in front of you so it will look better. A photo like that will stamp you as a real hayseed and make you the butt of a lot of jokes. When there is a person in the photo, the first thing viewers look at is the eyes. The viewers will then normally look at what the eyes of the photographed person are viewing. Thus hold the fish at shoulder level off to one side and look at the fish. Similar “blunder” photos crop up many times daily at the Grand Canyon. The photo is of someone looking right at the camera with the Grand Canyon in the background. Make the photo a lasting one by having the person stand off to one side and then look toward or point at something in the Grand Canyon. Let’s say you come in with a 9-pound speckled trout and you want a photo of it. Hold the fish with both hands, one supporting the head and the other grasping the tail to extend the fish to full length. Hold the catch to one side with the head of the fish at eye level, but a little to the front. Then look at the fish’s head. The resulting photo will show you with your head partially turned toward the fish and with your eye on the fish. The fish is what you want people to see when viewing the photo. Have the photographer move in close to snap the picture. You want the full length of the fish to show, but there is no reason for you to appear full length in the photo. After all, the important subject is the fish, not you’re fishing pants and old shoes. If there is any doubt at all about the light, use the flash. The poorest light for a daytime photo is during the time period between 10a.m. and 2p.m. Sure, the light may be strongest, but the sun will be overhead. A hat or cap will cast shadows on faces. Use a flash to eliminate those shadows. Avoid taking photos with the sun directly behind the photographer or behind the person in the photo. In one case, you end up with the photographer’s shadow on the person in the photo. In the other case, the result is a bright background behind a darkened subject. Record fish come along only a time or two in a lifetime. Trophy size fish may be caught only slightly more often. With this in mind, never take just one photo. Film is not expensive.(Prior to 2000). Your cell phone is a great tool as well. If your catch is big enough for a trophy, it is worth using a whole roll of film or as many photo’s available in your phone or I-pod. If it is a record fish, there is nothing wrong with using two or three rolls of film. You may never, ever catch a fish so large again. And take the photos from various angles with various backgrounds. Very often what you feel is the best pose may turn out to be the fourth or fifth, etc. best when you get the processed photos back. If the fish is to be taken to the taxidermist for mounting, make sure to take a number of color photos of the catch. It will enable the technician to better match the colors on the fish when he has to touch up the final mount. God bless your families and good fishing. See y’all on Galveston Bay. Capt Paul Marcaccio A Tribute to a Man and his Son In life, only a hand full of people, including your parents, can forevermore have a lasting effect on your natural ability. There was one who had a profound effect along with his son. That person was Bob Stephenson Sr. and Junior, as I knew him. Bob Jr. had a passion for the outdoors that his father gave him from the time his was just a little tot…………………………. Bob Sr. and his lovely wife Dottie have a wonderful family and shared everything about the outdoors with their sons and daughters. The first I remember Bob Sr. was he doing the commercials for Friday Night Wrestling for Paul Bausch. Then later Bob Sr. was the weatherman for CBS, channel 11 here in Houston. I'm not sure of the time frame next, but Johnny Valentino of Eagle Point tells me that his dad and Bob Sr. were close friends. Somehow, either Bubba or Johnny's dad convinced Bob Sr. to do a fishing report on the radio for the Outdoor Farm Show. Bam………Thus was born the re-nown show called The Bob Stephenson OUTDOORRRRRR Show. Sometime around 1968. You'll do not hold me to all these dates and time. The rest is history. Bob Sr. made a lasting effect on this guide and angler. The show played to a listening audience daily from 4am to 5am and on the weekends from 4-7am. Except Monday, when Bob Sr. would take a little time off, like maybe the barbers did as well. The format to this angler was simple. Tell it like it is. No exceptions. Wind direction, tide movement and general location of where you caught your fish. Bob Sr. expected no less than the truth. Lots of time, he would try to close the gap to where I was catching. All in good fun. Bob Sr. loved the outdoors like our Lord intented. He always had a smile, a look and a touch for everyone he came in contact with. His outdoor show was on the air for well over 30 years, heard on the AM radio side of 740,950 and finally settled down to the 610 spot where it played till our Lord called him home. This man knew more than about fishing and hunting than any I could remember in ten lifetimes. Forgive me while I dry my eyes a little…………………………….. His passion to help one and all was unique. From the advertising Boat Dealers, Professional Hunting and Fishing Guides, and especially the men and women that would call in to his show, He treated us all with the same passion and conviction for telling the truth above all else. He later tutored his son Bob Jr. to help so he could spend more time with his lovely wife Dottie and other members of his family. Bob Jr. and I became very close friends during the 80's. His passion mirrored his dad for the outdoors. Bob Jr. fished some of the fresh water tournament trails in the southwest. At some point, Bob Sr. asked Junior to continue the family tradition. Bob Jr. took over for his dad, so dad could spend quality time with his family and friends. Bobby was a great friend, who knew the importance of family and how to get the most out of all of us, when it came to hunting and fishing reports. There were times, he could push my buttons………….Man, and He was awesome. Bob Jr. maintained the airways all during the 80's, 90's and the 2000's. Everyone that came in contact with Bob Jr. loved and admired him as a person and a family man. His lovely wife Melba and daughters, Dana and Shelly are true grit to this writer. They all continue to live life to the fullest. Bob Jr. lived life the way you should. To the fullest. One day at a time. He was a man's man like his dad, Bob Sr. Bobby passed away in 2002. I will truly miss them both……. The show lives on in their memory. Capt Mickey Eastman and Benny Hatton are now the hosts daily. Tune in @ AM 610 Thurs-Sundays @ 4am. Great guys to listen to about the outdoors…………. I can still here them sometimes, while I drive toward the coast to go fishing. Bobby laughing out loud about someone's funny story and the show always closed with Bob Sr. famous line. Folks, HAVE FUN OUTDOORSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS…………………….. God truly blessed these two great men. Dottie, Melba, Dana and Shelly. Thank you for sharing your father and husbands. Capt. Paul Marcaccio-BOI. (Born on the island) With over 30 yrs. Fishing experiences the Texas Gulf Coast. U.S.C.G. & T. P. & W. license
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Saltwater Equipment-Do & Don't

Posted on Tuesday, 01/10/12 12:57 pm by captpaul in Galveston Bay Fishing Report with Capt Paul Marcaccio

 

                     Fishing Equipment-To do………………….

 

     It is often said that approximately 10 percent of the fisherman catch 80 percent of the fish.

     If so, what are the fishermen that make up the other 80 percent doing wrong?

     Many times it the little oversights that lead to a fisherman’s downfall and allow a trophy fish

To escape the hook and net.

     Here are a few ways I have managed over the years to lose fish.

     Old line – Neither braided or monofilament last forever.  Long periods of unuse, as well as constant action and excessive heat, weaken a line and cause it to break at the wrong time.

     How often an angler needs to change line depends on how much he or she fishes and the type of water they fish in. Braided line does not apply.

     Long hours of wade fishing around shell and structure might call for a line change every three or four trips.  As a general rule, the average angler should change line with each season (approximately four times a year).  Reels should be stored where line is not exposed to direct sunlight or excessive heat. You may select any number of lines. Personally, I prefer Sufix Elite or Pro-Mix. Other named brands are P-Line or Berkley. Cost is different with each. Braided line is more costly than mono. Will last up to a year without changing the line.

     Frayed line – Abrasion is probably the single greatest threat to a fishing line.

     A wise fisherman will scan the line or lightly run it through his fingers to check for any rough spots before each fishing trip.  Some anglers make it a habit to strip off and discard line before a fishing trip.  Check rod eyes (guides) for rust or rough spots, which could damage line.

     Damaged hooks – Dull hooks mean lost fish.  Either sharpen the points or replace the hook.

     Some fishermen make the mistake of reusing hooks, which have been spread open.  Bending the hook back into shape weakens the metal. 

     And, of course, rusty hook should be replaced.

     Boat inventory – I had a nice trout at the side of the boat.  When I reached for my landing net, it was tangled in my client’s feet.  I lost the fish before I could free the net.  To be prepared for such instances, an angler should be certain of three areas:

1.      To be able to move freely around the boat if need be, without stepping in an open tackle box, or getting tangled in something (anchor line or landing net).

2.      The landing net is within easy reach.

3.      Once the fish is on board, there is a storage box or ice chest to put it in so it won’t flop overboard, which has happened on more than one occasion.

 

      FUEL- always has a FULL tank of gasoline when leaving the dock. Never try to do it with less. Either weather or your ability will cause you to run out. It’s expensive to call the Coast Guard or you’re soon to be distant friend. By keeping the fuel tank full, condensation will not form in the tank, which could turn to water and cause the motor to stop. Water and gas is no marriage on the bay.

        REELS- always carry an extra reel in your tackle with line on it. That way, if you have a professional override (backlash), you can replace the reel and continue to catch those pesky specs and redfish.

         RODS- some will bring an extra rod for that moment when you least expect it to break. Most guides have adequate room for just that. Check the rod after each trip for nicks or stress areas after you may have hit the gunnels rail or a t-top.

         BOAT TRAILER- now here a subject that if not properly keep checked, folks will wave at you as they drive by on the way to the bay or gulf. Pay close attention to your buddy bearing, check them after each trip and use a small amount of pressure to place additional grease in the tube. Not too much or you will blow out your seal. Check the springs and lubricate after each outing.  Wiring important for turn lights and running lights. McClain Trailers in Channelview has great parts for all your trailer needs.

 

   There are many other ways to lose a fish.  Lack of concentration, not playing the fish long enough, poor net handling or lack of confidence can all set fish free.

     And, undoubtedly, many more fish losing techniques have yet to be developed.

    

     See ya’ll on Galveston Bay.

 

   

Captain Paul Marcaccio

 USCG & TP&W

 

    

 

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December Speckled Trout and Redfish!

Posted on Tuesday, 12/06/11 12:28 pm by captpaul in Galveston Bay Fishing Report with Capt Paul Marcaccio
Since early November, fishing has produced near limits of spec’s and red fish. Fishing prior and after these fronts has produced great numbers, using the moon phase and tidal movement. Fishing till dark has been excellent using drains and bayou’s as ambush points. Water temp is 52-56 degrees. Key is nervous bait or fish slicks…………Birds with a mix of turns and pelicans also a key to fish feeding near the surface. Areas like the Galveston Basin, Pelican Is. bridge, Campbell’s, Moses Lake, Clear Lake,Scott’s and Tabb’s bays. Trout to 20 inches under the birds and others to 23 inches near drains and bayou’s. Red fish are in the slot as well. Best soft plastic colors are pumpkin seed, plum, salt-pepper and chicken/chain..Also, Gulp is working in the 5 inch shad with limetruse or neon pepper. Use 1/16, 1/8 or 1/4 depending on the depth. Fish waters from 4-10 feet, making sure there is structure(shell) or drop offs…………….. Winter patterns are tough. Patience and your presentation will reward your stringer with good numbers to 20 inches. Stop by Reliant Park next month @ booth 632 and visit us at the Boat Show. Next door to Fishing Tackle Unlimited. Merry Christmas the fisherman
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Fall Patterns for Spec's & Reds

Posted on Monday, 11/07/11 10:25 am by captpaul in Galveston Bay Fishing Report with Capt Paul Marcaccio

Recent cold fronts have triggered the Fall Run of fishing under the birds in Trinity and East Bays………….
Two or three days after these northers, gulf waters again return water to the bays causing shrimp to migrate into the open bays near drains and bayous. What a great time to catch good numbers and limits of both speckled trout and redfish. The key is water temp along with light winds.
Present water temp is 68 degrees and and should see low 60′s. Light winds follow these blue northers.
Key area are the back end near Marsch Point, Campbell Bayou and near Marker 72, the backside of Atkinson Is.
Use 3/8 or 1/4 lead or 1/2 gold spoon. Colors should mirror the shrimp, pumpkin, plum, salt-pepper along with your favorites……………….
Spec’s are in the 18-22 inch and for under the birds a great time for all who can enjoy………….
Redfish are in the slot as well.
This action should continue till the holidays………..
Enjoy the outdoors. Happy Thanksgiving and may our Lord bless you and your family
the fisherman

Marcaccio's Fishin Guide Service
402 14th Street
San Leon, Texas 77539
Cell :: 281-788-4041
Home :: 281-339-0475

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Boliver Peninsula - Best Winter Secret

Posted on Friday, 10/28/11 12:16 pm by captpaul in Galveston Bay Fishing Report with Capt Paul Marcaccio
Bolivar Peninsula- Winter’s Best Kept Secret

Just a few miles northeast of Galveston Island lies the strip of land called the Bolivar Peninsula. Anglers largely overlook the peninsula, as they pass by its shores on the way to crowded East Bay hot spots. The fact of the matter is that the peninsula has a lot to offer anglers year round, particularly in the winter months. The peninsula appeals to boaters, wade fishermen, and land based fishermen.

Fishing opportunities for boaters are almost endless. Among the most popular places in Bolivar for boaters are the jetties. The jetties serve as a breakwater for the Galveston-Houston Ship channel, while at the same time, providing an ideal structure for attracting forage fish and the predators that feed on them. This structure holds fish year round. Wintertime is extremely productive because of the combination of structure and quick access to the deep water of the ship channel. The best bait in this area is finger mullet, if not available, use Saltwater Assassins, or Stanley Jigs. These soft plastics offer great hook ups if worked slowly. Also, use Mirrolure slow sinking plugs like the MR 19, 38 or 51 series. Color varies depending on water clarity. Light for clear and dark for off-colored water


The Intercostals Waterway runs between the backside of Bolivar and Goat Island. Speckled trout, Redfish and Flounder (Texas Grand Slam as some refer to catchin’ all three the same day). The waterway is an excellent area to fish when those blue northern are upon us. The shoreline is all but protected except for a gusty northeast or southwest wind…………………Be sure and wear wading boots to protect ones legs from our flounders with pony tails???? All year long. ForEverLAST Boots work great. Se them at FTU in Houston or Katy,Texas

Seviers Cove and the Pig Pens are two of the many spots boaters target for winter trout and redfish. Seviers Cut is a land cut in Goat Island with a shallow channel into East Bay. The Pig Pens is located on the bay side of East Bay, just west of Seviers. Soft baits like mentioned earlier along with the famous Corky by Paul Brown, works for those sow trout. Most anglers prefer to wade the latter both early and late afternoon, with an outgoing tide. Be sure and have a good graphite rod and small diameter line, so as not to attract too much attention. Fishing Tackle Unlimited has a tremendous rod called the All-Pro Series Green Rod…………………………….and Sufix Line to spool that great reel in 30lb test.

The Bolivar Pocket is another popular wade fishing spot on the peninsula. The Pocket is located between the old lighthouse and the base of the Bolivar Jetties. This is a prime spot to target as the temperature drops with winter cold fronts…………………………..

The Bay side of Rollover Pass is also a very productive area to wade during the winter months. Mirrolures and the Stanley wedge tail top the list to throw when wading Rollover Bay. Both resemble a mullet, which is a winter meal for that trophy trout that looks for that one good meal for several days………………..

Rollover Pass and the jetties are two of the most productive areas for land-based fishermen. The cooler months of the years are plagued with single tides coupled with minimal tidal movement.
Any trout fisherman will tell you,” Moving water catches moving fish. ”Rollover Pass is just that area. Trophy trout and redfish congregate and feed in that narrow pass. Live shrimp will almost always work for a large stringer of solid fish, but it’s next to impossible to find that time of year. See a white flag. Stop and get ‘em. Live finfish, solid-bodied mullet imitation and large soft plastics accounts for most of the truly large trout pulled from the pass each year at that time…………………..

Bolivar is loaded with good winter fishing locations and deserves a little investigation. With the upcoming hunting season, our fishing brothers have thinned out greatly. This gives those of us who fish year round a little more quiet time to catch that speckled trout or redfish. These prime areas receive less pressure at this time of year. Your brothers that are reading this at the deer camp always have fun outdoors. This writer will be thinking about you…………………


Stop by our booth at the upcoming Houston Boat & Travel Show. The show begins January 6th and ends January 15th. We are located next to Fishing Tackle Unlimited in booth 632. Bring your outdoor photos for us to see and enjoy.
Until next time, good Fishin’ or just as my fishing mentor always use to say, “Have Fun Outdoors”. We love you’ll Pappy and Junior. God bless………
Capt Paul Marcaccio
BOI, U.S.C.G. & T.P. &W.
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Redfish Rodeo

Posted on Saturday, 09/17/11 6:34 pm by captpaul in Galveston Bay Fishing Report with Capt Paul Marcaccio

This past few days, redfish have been sighted and caught from the Boliver Wells to the upper end of Galveston bay around marker 72 and the Seabrook area.

This writer and guide has no reasonable explanation for the great numbers being caught and seen in herds. May have to do with this extreme drought and salinity in and around our system. TPW reported recently that the salinity level was well over 40 parts per million. We only require 10-12 for speckled trout and redfish. Go figure……….

We are leaving the dock around 530 am and returning before 1100am with a great box of redfish and several good speckled trout to 23 inches.

Best bite has been with live shrimp carolina rigged and GULP in limetruse or nucular chicken. Using 3/8 lead with moving tide and 1/4 oz with a slack tide. Fishing in 10-12 feet near shell and mud bottom. Areas like the Boliver Wells and A-1. Stay on the outside of A-1 working the wells on the downside of the current. Other areas near Seabrook and Markers 72 down to 64 are holding slicks and pods of nervous mullet.

God Bless...
The Fisherman

Marcaccio's Fishin Guide Service
402 14th Street
San Leon, Texas 77539
Cell :: 281-788-4041
Home :: 281-339-0475

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Flounder Fishing for Everyone

Posted on Monday, 08/15/11 11:45 am by captpaul in Galveston Bay Fishing Report with Capt Paul Marcaccio
Flounder Fishing – for Everyone

Successful flounder fishing is not for everyone. If you simply cast out the bait and wait, you may catch a flounder or two, but in general you’re in for a disappointment and frustration. Successful hook and line flounder fishing rates right at the head of the class. If you can successfully catch flounder on hook and line, you have bragging rights and should consider yourself an expert.
This writer can give a lot of tips on catching flounder, but when it comes to actually setting the hook in the mouth of a flatfish, it all boils down to two items: “Concentration and Experience”!
“It seems everyone else can catch flounder except me.” I hear that so often this time of year, when the flounder make their migratory move to the Gulf.

First off, the flounder has no swim bladder. This simply means the fish goes through life swimming or lying on or near the bottom. They are unable to suspend themselves motionless at any depth. Furthermore, it doesn’t have the fin structure nor body shape for fast swimming. It tends to move in short darts that appear to be fast, because when flounder move they raise a lot of silt off the bottom.

The fish normally feed from ambush, lying partially hidden on the bottom until food matter moves or drifts close by. The fish quickly rises off the bottom, grabs the food and sinks right back to the bottom. This is where your experience comes into play. Most fish tend to engulf the bait. The flounder instead, hold it tightly with its teeth for a few seconds before ingesting. Some marine biologist says the fish does this to kill the bait before taking it deep into its mouth.
If you try to set the hook the instant you feel a pick-up. Odds are excellent you’ll tear the hook out of the bait and give the flounder a free meal. Instead, wait approximately ten (10) seconds before striking or setting the hook.
This writer prefers to palm my reel, letting the line run lightly between my thumb and forefinger. You would be surprised at what the flounder telegraphs up the taunt line. You can feel the fish working the bait, and you can feel when the fish takes the bait deep into its mouth. That’s the moment of truth to strike and set the hook. Experience this a few times and you will never forget it………

Since flounder normally feed on matter that drifts close by, successful flounder fishermen and women are those who fish every foot of the bottom within casting range. Do this by inching the bait along the bottom. When you feel the line taunt, treat it as if a flounder has grabbed the bait and not as if the hook fouled a snag. Wait the magic ten (10) seconds before setting the hook. This tackle can be modified to be used with a float in wading depth. Rig the float to hold the bait just a few inches above the bottom. Cast up current and allow the current to carry along the float so a lot of bottom can be covered.
When a flounder takes the bait, the float will stop moving and simply lean over in the current. Wait the magical ten (10) seconds, and then set the hook. If the float starts moving against the current, you can bet money that the infamous blue crab has grabbed the bait and moved off with it.
There are a number of good terminal rigs for flounder. I prefer a slip sinker attached to the line followed by a swivel, then 18 to 24 inches of leader line (20 to 30 lbs.) followed by a wide gap (circle hook) either #2 or #3. The best bait is either live mud minnows or finger mullet. When the bay temperature cools down less than 70 degrees. Live shrimp will also work as well.

The most effective artificial lure is any soft plastic bait. Bass assassin, shrimp tail, or chad tails. Use either 1/8 to ¼ oz. lead head. I prefer the Norton lazer screw on hooks or the new Bass Assassin screw on as well. Work the bait right on the bottom with your yo-yo effect on lifting and dropping the rod tip. I prefer the new All-Pro titanium rod made by Fishing Tackle Unlimited in either 6-1/2’ or 7’. It’s called the GREEN ROD…………………..


Hopefully, these tips give you a leg up on your next successful flounder trip.
Good luck and good fishing.
See y’all outdoors on Galveston Bay.
Capt. Paul Marcaccio

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East Galveston Bay

Posted on Thursday, 07/28/11 4:43 pm by captpaul in Galveston Bay Fishing Report with Capt Paul Marcaccio

You don’t need a huge bay for good fishing. A small bay with great structure plus marsh embossed borders can fill the bill.
That’s the case of East Bay, the smallest of the major bays in the Galveston Estuary. For years it was the best redfish bay on the upper Texas Coast, but back in those years it was also a best kept secret. East Bay is still the best upper coast redfish bay, but that’s no longer a secret, and the bay now gets heavy play from boaters and waders alike.
Starting with Hanna’s Reef on the southwest end, East Bay is rich with structure: scores of deep oyster reefs and pipe stands, Hanna’s Reef is a favorite of anglers who like to anchor their boats to fish cuts and drop-offs along the reef. The deep reefs to the northeast of Hanna’s Reef and extending back to the bay’s connection with the mouth of the Intracoastal Waterway are favored by drift anglers and those who like to fish the birds.
The borders of East Bay offer excellent wade fishing, especially the stretch along the Bolivar Peninsula side. This stretch from Goat Island, the bay’s junction with Lower Galveston Bay, back to Elm Grove offers excellent fishing for speckled trout, redfish and flounder. When the wind is light and parallel to the length of Bolivar Peninsula some of the bigger coves can be fished by drifting. Whether you drift or wade, a boat is needed to reach these waters because you have to cross the Intracoastal Waterway that runs the length of Bolivar Peninsula.
The whole of Chambers County side of East Bay can be waded, with the best action generally on the flats near the Anahuac National Wildlife Refuge. Access is either by the Refuge or near Smith’s Point. Reefs like Stephenson Pt., Deep, and Robinson Bayou, just to name a few good ones.
Some of the best redfish action in this bay is during the oyster season. Working oyster boats make the bay quite sandy and at times downright muddy. This isn’t conducive to decent fishing for speckled trout. The working oyster boats, however, stir up a lot of marine life upon which redfish feed. Fish in the immediate vacinity of the oyster boats. Fish the flats and along the saltgrass marshes on the Bolivar Peninsula side of the bay. As a rule of thumb, let the tidal movement move the sediment toward where you are drifting. Great production will results in following the oyster boats at times………………….
East Bay is like West Bay in that it is a Galveston Estuary body of water little affected by fresh water runoff from heavy rains. This bay has two close connections with the Gulf of Mexico. Consequently the salinity level in this bay remains fairly constant. The connection with the Gulf of Mexico is Rollover Pass about 20 miles from the tip of Bolivar Peninsula. The other connection is the Lower Galveston Bay at the mouth of the entrance to the seaway between the North and South Jetties.
Rollover Pass deserves special attention. It offers boatless anglers excellent flounder and golden croaker fishing every fall and spring.
There is no lack of fishing facilities on Bolivar Peninsula. They are located all along the Intracoastal Waterway. It’s a different story on the Chambers County side of the bay. There are launching facilities on the roads leading to the bay, but all the concession stands selling bait, tackle, ice and food supplies are located near Smith’s Point at the far northwest corner of the bay.
Take advantage of the north shoreline, reefs like Deep, Whitehead and Richards, are excellent reefs to drift and find good solid speckled trout and redfish. Make use of the Salt Water Bass Assassins or Mirrolures baits in soft or hard plastics. Colors include bone-diamond, limetruse, Texas roach and pearl-chartreuse. Top water products like the She Pup or the Baby Super Spook are great tools for those elusive fish over 25 inches. Colors should be light in clear water and dark in off-colored water. Present temps are in the mid-70?
Recent winds and little rains from the upper watersheds have had a great effect on catching of speckled trout and redfish. Spring tides are up 1-2 feet at present. Fish are close to drains and bayous on the incoming and out some on the outgoing tide periods. Tropical system today will add additional water to our bays.
Always file a flight plan. That way, someone can start to look for your group should you break down or worse, need medical assistance.

God bless you and your families.
Capt Paul Marcaccio

Marcaccio's Fishin Guide Service
402 14th Street
San Leon, Texas 77539
Cell :: 281-788-4041
Home :: 281-339-0475


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Summer Patterns-Galveston Bay Complex

Posted on Friday, 07/22/11 4:25 pm by captpaul in Galveston Bay Fishing Report with Capt Paul Marcaccio

The lack of rainwater is a double edge sword. Great salinity but too salty in the bay systems. Be extremely careful to clean your equipment after each fishing trip to Galveston Bay.

Live bait, the likes of shrimp or croakers, have had solid hook ups to 6 lbs. Either carolina rig or a cork about three feet will due just right. However, the price is changing weekly based on supply and demand.

Soft plastics shad tails or Assassins in eithers plum, pumpkin seed or pearl are drawing hits from quality fish(redfish and speckled trout). Using 1/4 oz lead along with weedless gold spoon is adding up to limits of both fish.

Areas like Hannah’s, Deep reef, Moody’s, Frenchy’s in East Bay and the wells in Trinity like Sun Oil or A-1 or A-2. Please be extremly careful and go slow when entering A1 or A2. Lots of pipe just below the surface.

Using croakers now are still consistant as the full moon just passed and those females are laying their eggs all along the ship channel and reefs in Galveston Bay.

Leave early and return before noon if possible. Plenty of liquids such as waters or G-aid. Sunscreen a must with protected sunglasses like Costa Del Mar.

Let a veteren know that we appreciate their time served whether peacetime or in country……………..
god bless
the fisherman

Marcaccio's Fishin Guide Service
402 14th Street
San Leon, Texas 77539
Cell :: 281-788-4041
Home :: 281-339-0475

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East Bay-Galveston

Posted on Thursday, 07/21/11 6:57 pm by captpaul in Galveston Bay Fishing Report with Capt Paul Marcaccio

The water in our system is hovering around 86 degrees. The lack of rainwater has caused a number of fish to find their way to the back waters, the likes of sand shark and black tips…………..

We are able to make use of that small croacker to catching near limits of solid speckled trout and a few slotted redfish.

Using soft plastic baits the likes of Assassins, Norton, Stanley and Gulp are equal to the task other than more casting to catch the limits. Color are limetruse, plum, salt-pepper, lime tiger and new penny.

From Marker 62 to 38 along the channel are areas and Hannahs, Deep and Frenchy’s are scoring as well. Use either 3/8 or 1/4 depending on tidal flow. Carolina rig with 1/4 oz or just a pinch on 1/4 oz will work for the live croackers.

Several good speckled trout just over 25 inches are being released. You are allowed to retain one daily. Most fish are 18-23 inches. Redfish are in the slot to 23 inches.

Leave before daylight and returning by 1100 am. Use sunscreen and liquids like water and gateraid will hydrate yor system to keep you from overheating.

Enjoy our Lords outdoors and take the little ones……………….

god bless

the fisherman

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July-August-Options on Galveston Bay

Posted on Saturday, 07/09/11 3:27 pm by captpaul in Galveston Bay Fishing Report with Capt Paul Marcaccio

The trip was planned to explore several areas in the San Leon, Dksn Bay, and Texas City near the Dike. But, the old pier pilings that have always been such a magnet for redfish beckoned. It's hard for this guide to give up good old bad habits, especially when they have produced fried redfish filets so many times. The Big Bay Parker just seemed to go on autopilot, quickly swinging into familiar territory. Near the April Fool shoreline and Eagle Point. On a FTU ¼ oz wide gap lead head, the limetruse plastic mullet imitation looked deadly swimming through the sandy green bay waters. Long cast with my Green Titanium rod back toward the shallows drew the bait in an almost parallel course to the old pier pilings near April Fool Pt. Just as the sun was clearing the eastern shoreline of East Bay, my 6-½ foot rod bowed deeply. The power and style of the run indicated that I had a good redfish. The ultra light action of the rod along with my 30 lb Sufix braid proved to be lethal again. However, the pier pilings are different. It was over in less than two minutes. Twice more, my presentation proved to fool me'. It was embarrassing…………………….. Then there was that magic day a couple of days later, back near the Texas City Dike. Using medium action Green Rods, four of us did battle on some awesome black drum. Lots of Big black drum. It was a bright sunny day with a light east wind. Those fish were stacked in a deep hole near the Dike. And they were eating fresh blue crabs just as fast as we could serve them up. Passers by on the Bolivar Ferry were treated to several Herculean tussles. These spawn-minded females were all in the 25-40 lb class and they make ones forearms similar to Popeye's……………………… There was the beautiful April morning, spent with a very dear friend, Brother Chuck, around Goat Island near the Hog Pins in East Bay. We used several assortments of She Dog's, baby Spooks, and soft plastic Assassins and Norton baits to tally a mixed bag. By the end of the day, we had waded that entire shoreline and come away with speckled trout, redfish, sand trout and even one grandee gaff stop. My brother Chuck was equal to the test and found great success, both on top as well as feeding those great fish with soft plastic. And yet again was the morning with Mike Heidemann and Casey, along the north shoreline of Trinity Bay. Get this, with no tidal movement; we boxed speckled trout to around four pounds on soft plastic Stanley Jigs and Salt Water Assassin baits. On still another day, when cabin fever trampled good sense, a hasty run to the back of Moses Lake seemed to ease the situation. That campaign featured deteriorating conditions with a light drizzle. The only fish happening were several sand trout and some Hugh ribbonfish. Still again, the need was served.

The aforementioned episodes are described, not for the quality or quantity they produced, but to highlight the exciting fact that July and August are great times to be on Galveston Bay. Most of the action we find on the Texas Coast pecks during the warmer months. By the firth of May, water temperature is in that magical 70's and the summer smorgasbord is being served up…………………. The large black drum show first. While the run pecks in September, bull redfish are year round possibility. As the beachfront warms to the sunlight, gaffs top, speckled trout and keeper redfish begin the work the shallow guts. Big flounder are funneling through the passes and ditches, working there way back into the upper part of Trinity and East Bay. Sharks will oversee the migration in numbers most people do not begin to realize. The first of these will usually be the small sand sharks. Not far behind them will be the black tip, bulls and hammerheads. By mid-June, Spanish mackerel, jackfish pompano, king mackerel and even ling will be taken near the beachfront. We are catching a great number of sharks in the bay this year due to the higher salinity levels because we have had little or no rainwater……………..go figure.

It is easy to rush this great out door experience. As much as this writer and guide love fishing the colder months, I eagerly anticipate that which is to come. Rare is the year that I don't try to will the fish into place before it's time. The next three months will offer more and more varied opportunities than any other time of the year. The possibilities are virtually limitless. And every year, during the dog days of summer, I suddenly blink one hot, steamy afternoon and wonder where those magic days of spring went already………………………….

 

God bless you and your families, while you enjoy His great backyard. Captain Paul Marcaccio, USGC & TP & W... B.O.I. (born on the island) with over 30 years of Coastline experience.

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Salty Shorelines

Posted on Monday, 05/16/11 5:29 pm by captpaul in Galveston Bay Fishing Report with Capt Paul Marcaccio

Salty Shorelines

Recent days are similar to the lower coast. Lots of wind and salinity is off the charts. Some areas in galveston bay are reaching upwards of 30ppm…………..parts per million of salt to frest.
Areas like D. Bayou, Trinity River and the San Jacinto are holding fish north of I-10 and west of I-45.
Lack of rainwater is playing a hugh role in allowing these fish to move up fresh water areas.

Both Trinity and East are holding solid fish when the winds allow us to fish the open waters. The east and south shorelines are holding great numbers of speckled trout and redfish on a falling tide. Areas like Double bayou, Van-u-tun, Richards, Robinson bayou, and near Seivers cut are holding solid trout to 22 inches………………..

Best bet is using pumpkin seed, plum, chicken-on-chain, and limetruse. 1/4 oz lead worked on or near the bottom in about 5-7 feet. Visibility is poor to about a foot.

Top water colors are chrome, black or bone in Baby Spook or She Pup…………………

Drifting areas like Hannah’s, Tide Gauge, Deep or near Elegrove Point………………..

god bless
the fisherman

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April Winds-Wade Em

Posted on Tuesday, 04/12/11 11:33 am by captpaul in Galveston Bay Fishing Report with Capt Paul Marcaccio

Folks,
Take advantage of the SSE and East winds to find great waters to wade early and late evening.

Shorelines in East Bay and Trinity Bay. From Rollover Pass to Seivers Cut in East has been awesome on top water. From Double bayou to the mouth of the river, has been as well great numbers are being taken on top water as well.

Target any and all drains and bayous………….Falling tide is the key along with nervous bait or shad.
Use small baits like She Pups or Baby Super Spooks……..
1/4 oz gold spoons are really making a difference for those pesky redfish.
Use pumpkin seed, plum or pearl for soft plastics in 1/4 oz lead when wading.

Water temp is 70 degrees. Visibility is awesome to two feet.
More later…….
god bless
the fisherman

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March Madness

Posted on Friday, 03/25/11 10:02 am by captpaul in Galveston Bay Fishing Report with Capt Paul Marcaccio
March 11th, 2011 Current catching of both speckled trout and redfish have been excellent to near limits for both fish. Areas in Trinity near Van-u-tun, Double Bayou, The river and north of there. East Bay has produced good number in the 20 inch range on or near Hannah’s, Lady ‘s Pass, or Elmgrove point. Campbell’s Bayou is showing signs of bird activity near Sand Is. or near Virginia Pt. Best colors are the shad body in either chicken-on-chain, chartruse or black/chartruse tail. Use either 1/8 or 1/4 oz lead Using 1/4 or 1/2 oz gold spoon is effective as well. Top water bite was excellent before the water temp dropped in the mid-60′s. Chrome, bone or chartruse works best at a slow retreive. Braid line from Sufix 30lb has been seeing good results. Fish are at or on the bottom in 5-7 feet. Visibility is good to about 2(two) feet. Water temp is hovering around 60 degrees. yesterday. Added sunlight will aide the temp toward the magic 70 degrees’s.  My rod preference is The Green Rod in 6’6″ in the fast tip. EXL1. or 6’2″, same tip and action. This year Spring Break is starting great with yesterday’s results for a limit of reds and good numbers of spec’s to 22 inches. Finding shell and mud with some slickin in the area will produce good numbers of fish. Enjoyed everyone’s visit @ George R. Brown fishing Show last week. Look foward to your next trip and the memories we will share together. god bless the fisherman
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Galveston Bay-Frost Free

Posted on Tuesday, 02/22/11 8:05 pm by captpaul in Galveston Bay Fishing Report with Capt Paul Marcaccio

Folks……………………..
The recent freeze in and around this complex has fallen short of any measureable loss of the resource.
Our speckled trout and redfish found deeper waters during that time and therefore, our recent days have been excellent. Limits of reds and spec’s over 20 inches.

Water is by far the best in recent time for this guide and writer. Visibility is awesome and water temp is 54 degrees.
It’s been a long time this fishing guide has seen this water look great.

Presently using soft plastic from Gulp or plum or chartruse.
Keep it in the zone by using 1/8 oz jig heads and keep it just off the bottom near shell and mud.

Area’s like Campbell’s, Texas City Dike, along with Hannah’s and Deep reef……………………

This February will go time as one of our better months considering it should be rainy, windy and real cold,,,,,,,,,,,,
Call your buddy or myself………………
God bless
the fisherman

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Fall Patterns n Full Mode

Posted on Tuesday, 10/19/10 3:44 pm by captpaul in Galveston Bay Fishing Report with Capt Paul Marcaccio
October 11th, 2010

The past two weeks have been excellent for those redfish n the slot as well as speckled trout to 5 lbs……………
The entire bay system is lights out, from Greens Cut to the Wildlife area, including areas in Trinity Bay as well……………
Best bet is 5-7 feet of water over scattered shell and mud, like Greens,Hannah, Deep,Frenchy’s. Water temp is near 70 degree’s. Visibility is good to about 2-3 feet.
Birds are working near the ICW in West Bay, near Sm. Point and out side the Spillway in Trinity Bay.
Colors are plum, chartruse, black,pearl and glow. Bass Assassin or Norton San eels are working baits to use.
Use 3/8 on or near the bottom and 1/4 oz while drifting those shell pads. Long drifts are necessary to stay on ‘em.

Daylight begins near 7am and gets dark about 7pm. Tides are really helping pull that bait from drains and bayou’s.

Key on slicks and nervous bait working over the shell, keeping a watchful eye on the horizon for those diving gulls……………..

This pattern will continue well into the Christmas season. God’s backyard is awesome. Bring your A game along with jackets and warm pants. Some find out they failed to layer up……………….

Enjoy your outdoor activity hunting or fishing. Cast and Blast……………………..

God bless

the fisherman

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Summer Pattern Speckled Sea Trout

Posted on Monday, 08/09/10 4:40 pm by captpaul in Galveston Bay Fishing Report with Capt Paul Marcaccio
This past month of July 2010 will be remembered as one of our Gulf coast hottest from the weather to production of or finest fish along the coast. Speckled trout have been caught in good numbers using an array of baits. Depending on your skill level, both plastic and live croackers have resulted in limits and near limits of that great fish along with good numbers of slot redfish. Live bait has been in good supply due to folks like Eagle Point and Hillman. They have done a great work to keep us fishermen in ample supply of those great bait fish. On the other hand, soft plastic users have been rewarded with great numbers as well. It does require more casting. Best colors are pearl, glow, limetruse and texas roach. Using 3/8 or 1/2 and maybe 1/4 oz lead depending on the currents. Fish are on or near the bottom in 8-10-feet. Visibility is great and temp is hovering around 85 degrees. Areas like Hannah’s,Deep, Tide Gauge, Campbells and the wells inTrinity are producing good size spec’s to 24 inches. Wells in C Lease and F lease along with the Sun Oil in Trinity Bay. Birds working near Smith Point and near the Dredge……………… Best time is daylight till 1100 am or 7pm till dark…….depending if you can get any tidal movement. Wading near Sievers and the Hog Pins have produced great speckled trout. Umbrella Point near Dow and Virginia Pt in Campbells are also working to catch spec’s. Reds showing up near Sm Point on the shell in 5-6 feet over near Richards reef. Use sunscreen and drink water and gater-aid or G2. More later this week. Got a new fishing report. You can now post and comment when you log in to my site God bless and enjoy the outdoors the fisherman
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Weather, Water and Equipment

Posted on Friday, 03/06/09 10:44 am by captpaul in Galveston Bay Fishing Report with Capt Paul Marcaccio
Remember fish are cold-blooded creatures. Their bodies take on the temperature of the element (water) in which they live. Fish caught in winter feel as cold as ice, while those taken in the summer feel warm and as a result the meat spoils much faster. Weather extremes, sweltering heat in the summer and bitter cold in the winter, can make for difficult fishing.

Many people cut down on their number of fishing trips during these extremes. There is no chart that says that weather extremes make for bad fishing, but that's only if you aren't familiar with how the fish react to the weather. A point to keep in mind is the temperature of the water isn't the same in every location.

In the winter, surface water is coldest until it reaches about 38 degrees Fahrenheit and then it sinks to the bottom. Consequently, fish caught in very shallow water in a sudden freeze are often filled, whereas those caught in areas where the water is deep simply go to the bottom to escape the freeze. The cold slows the body functions of the fish and it will remain near the bottom almost in a stupor during a cold spell.

The temperature varies in bodies of water in the heat of summer, too. Shallow water becomes the warmest, and when this occurs, fish move into deep water where the temperature is more to their liking. The deeper water is where the oxygen content is more consistent, whereas in shallow areas the oxygen content depletes as the temperature rises. The rising temperature in shallow water causes an increase in the salinity level. When fishing in hot weather, you will score most consistently by and on an incoming tide. An incoming tide tends to cool the water on flats where the bulk of marine food is located. During the middle part of the day – from about 10:00am until 4:00pm – the best fishing is generally in middle parts of the bay where the water is deeper and cooler.

At this time of year some excellent speckled trout fishing can be enjoyed around the pipe stands and gas wells in lower Galveston Bay, as well as the spoil banks along the ship channel. When beachfront waters clear sufficiently for speckled trout fishing, the best time to go is early in the morning if you’re wading. After 10:00am, as the shallow surf warms, speckled trout move to deeper water, This is when you can do well fishing from the T-head of a beachfront pier. Heat of the day fishing can be very good in the deep water around the north and south jetties. Except for Spanish mackerel, ling and a few other surface feeders, the best fishing at the jetties is at the bottom of hot weather. Go on an incoming or high tide because the water exchange from the open Gulf of Mexico will be a little cooler.

Summer fishing always poses a problem for those using live bait. You need a constant circulation of water in the bait tanks. When you’re hauling bait from the bait stand to your fishing location, put chunks of ice in a Ziplock bag in the container. It will lower the temperature of the water and keep the bait from becoming over active and subsequently dying. Cool water has a calming effect on bait, especially shrimp. Cool water is important for fishermen also. Never leave the dock without plenty of drinking water for yourself. While we are on the subject of things for yourself, don’t forget your fishing bag. You know the old saying, “Don’t leave home without it.”

Unfortunate experiences linger in my memory. If you spend enough time on the water, sooner or later, you will have your own tales to tell. Most of us expect to return to the marina sometime after a full day on the water without any mishaps. We all know the weather in the afternoon will be just like the stillness and sunshine of the morning. But, sometimes it does not turn out that way. My fishing bag goes with me on every trip. The Galveston Bay complex can change quickly to thunderstorms on these pleasant days of summer and even in the winter preceding these major cold fronts. Pack an extra jacket (water-resistant), long pants and an extra cotton shirt. Also, place an extra hat, just in case. No one likes to spend the entire day out on the water without one. Everyone should carry a first aid kit. In addition, take your cellular phone with extra batteries, which can come in handy if you need to call 9-1-1. A handheld VHF radio will also suffice. In your first aid kit, place a box of matches, they can be used to start a fire if you wind up on deserted shoreline. Fishing pliers are essential. Many times I have had to use extra ones in my bag, because a friend didn’t bring his or we lost them overboard. Throw in a folding fillet knife or, if room permits, an electric fillet knife with an extension cord.

The insect life aboard my boat would amaze you. You can bet, if you start to wade fish early one morning and get close enough to the grass line without much wind, you will find a swarm of gnats, flies, live bugs or our infamous mosquitoes, feeding on your body. Any type of insect repellent (can, tube or spray) can be a skin-saver. In addition, sunblock and lip balm can keep you out of harms way in the sun. Sunglasses don’t last forever, even if they are tied around your neck. Carry an extra pair. If you wear bifocals, take a back-up pair. Without them it can be a long, out-of-focus day out there.

If you take food, it pays to add a little more than you intend to eat. Carry some emergency rations like candy bars, peanuts or raisins. Place them in a plastic bag. Speaking of plastic bags, throw some extra ones in your fishing bag. You’ll find plenty of uses for them, and they work well when you are packing your fillets. If you are curious as I am about how well other boats are doing, or if you just want to scan the horizon for flocks of birds, binoculars can come in handy. A small, lightweight pair will fit in the bag.

Remember that this is a small bag, not a suitcase.

Based on your own experience, you’ll probably come up with some other items that are important for your area. Of course, it pays to take an extra spool of line and maybe a good back-up reel, plus all that tackle you think you will need.

As Always, good luck and have fun outdoors.
See Y’all on Galveston Bay

Capt. Paul Marcaccio
http://www.gofishgalveston.com
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